1. The Rhetorical Power of Popular Culture: Considering Mediated Texts

Deanna D. Sellnow

Can TV shows, popular music, advertisements, and films help us understand rhetorical theory and criticism? The Rhetorical Power of Popular Culture, Second Edition includes examples like these to make rhetorical theory and criticism accessible, relevant, and meaningful. Exploring the powerfully persuasive rhetorical messages that pervade daily life, the book provides an easy-to-understand introduction to rhetorical theory and criticism by focusing on the powerful role that popular culture plays in persuading us what to believe and how to behave. The book’s step-by-step approach and range of popular culture examples help students learn to apply rhetorical theory and criticism to their own lives and assigned work.

    The Rhetorical Power of Popular Culture: Considering Mediated Texts

    Deanna D. Sellnow

    Can TV shows, popular music, advertisements, and films help us understand rhetorical theory and criticism? The Rhetorical Power of Popular Culture, Second Edition includes examples like these to make rhetorical theory and criticism accessible, relevant, and meaningful. Exploring the powerfully persuasive rhetorical messages that pervade daily life, the book provides an easy-to-understand introduction to rhetorical theory and criticism by focusing on the powerful role that popular culture plays in persuading us what to believe and how to behave. The book’s step-by-step approach and range of popular culture examples help students learn to apply rhetorical theory and criticism to their own lives and assigned work.

  2. Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture: Media Education for the 21st Century (The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Reports on Digital Media and Learning)

Henry Jenkins

Many teens today who use the Internet are actively involved in participatory cultures — joining online communities (Facebook, message boards, game clans), producing creative work in new forms (digital sampling, modding, fan videomaking, fan fiction), working in teams to complete tasks and develop new knowledge (as in Wikipedia), and shaping the flow of media (as in blogging or podcasting). A growing body of scholarship suggests potential benefits of these activities, including opportunities for peer-to-peer learning, development of skills useful in the modern workplace, and a more empowered conception of citizenship. Some argue that young people pick up these key skills and competencies on their own by interacting with popular culture; but the problems of unequal access, lack of media transparency, and the breakdown of traditional forms of socialization and professional training suggest a role for policy and pedagogical intervention.This report aims to shift the conversation about the “digital divide” from questions about access to technology to questions about access to opportunities for involvement in participatory culture and how to provide all young people with the chance to develop the cultural competencies and social skills needed. Fostering these skills, the authors argue, requires a systemic approach to media education; schools, afterschool programs, and parents all have distinctive roles to play.The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Reports on Digital Media and Learning

    Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture: Media Education for the 21st Century (The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Reports on Digital Media and Learning)

    Henry Jenkins

    Many teens today who use the Internet are actively involved in participatory cultures — joining online communities (Facebook, message boards, game clans), producing creative work in new forms (digital sampling, modding, fan videomaking, fan fiction), working in teams to complete tasks and develop new knowledge (as in Wikipedia), and shaping the flow of media (as in blogging or podcasting). A growing body of scholarship suggests potential benefits of these activities, including opportunities for peer-to-peer learning, development of skills useful in the modern workplace, and a more empowered conception of citizenship. Some argue that young people pick up these key skills and competencies on their own by interacting with popular culture; but the problems of unequal access, lack of media transparency, and the breakdown of traditional forms of socialization and professional training suggest a role for policy and pedagogical intervention.This report aims to shift the conversation about the “digital divide” from questions about access to technology to questions about access to opportunities for involvement in participatory culture and how to provide all young people with the chance to develop the cultural competencies and social skills needed. Fostering these skills, the authors argue, requires a systemic approach to media education; schools, afterschool programs, and parents all have distinctive roles to play.The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Reports on Digital Media and Learning

  3. MediaMaking: Mass Media in a Popular Culture

Larry Grossberg

The Second Edition of this bestselling text takes a unique approach to the study of mass communication and cultural studies by examining media as a whole - newspapers, books, magazines, radio, television, film - and its relationship with culture and society. Rather than viewing each major medium separately, authors Lawrence Grossberg, Ellen Wartella, D. Charles Whitney, and J. Macgregor Wise contend that mass communication cannot be studied apart from the other institutions in society and the other dimensions of social life - each is shaping and defining the other. MediaMaking: Mass Media in a Popular Culture explores the variety of ways in which the media are involved in our social lives, including the institutional, economic, social, cultural, and historical aspects.

    MediaMaking: Mass Media in a Popular Culture

    Larry Grossberg

    The Second Edition of this bestselling text takes a unique approach to the study of mass communication and cultural studies by examining media as a whole - newspapers, books, magazines, radio, television, film - and its relationship with culture and society. Rather than viewing each major medium separately, authors Lawrence Grossberg, Ellen Wartella, D. Charles Whitney, and J. Macgregor Wise contend that mass communication cannot be studied apart from the other institutions in society and the other dimensions of social life - each is shaping and defining the other. MediaMaking: Mass Media in a Popular Culture explores the variety of ways in which the media are involved in our social lives, including the institutional, economic, social, cultural, and historical aspects.

  4. Media, Culture and Society: An Introduction

Paul Hodkinson

Clearly organized, systematic, and combining a critical survey of the field with a finely judged assessment of cutting edge developments, this book provides a ‘must have’ contribution to media and communication studies. Ideally pitched for students it explores the media saturation of everyday life while carefully emphasizing the complex relationships which exist between media, culture, and society. The text is organized into three distinctive parts which fall neatly into research and teaching requirements: Elements of the Media; Media, Power and Control; and Media, Identity and Culture.

    Media, Culture and Society: An Introduction

    Paul Hodkinson

    Clearly organized, systematic, and combining a critical survey of the field with a finely judged assessment of cutting edge developments, this book provides a ‘must have’ contribution to media and communication studies. Ideally pitched for students it explores the media saturation of everyday life while carefully emphasizing the complex relationships which exist between media, culture, and society. The text is organized into three distinctive parts which fall neatly into research and teaching requirements: Elements of the Media; Media, Power and Control; and Media, Identity and Culture.

  5. Cultures of Popular Music (Issues in Cultural & Media Studies)

Andy Bennett

What is the relationship between youth culture and popular music?  
How have they evolved since the second world war?  
What can we learn from a global perspective?  
In this lively and accessible text, Andy Bennett presents a comprehensive cultural, social and historical overview of post-war popular music genres, from rock ‘n’ roll and psychedelic pop, through punk and heavy metal, to rap, rave and techno. Providing a chapter by chapter account, Bennett also examines the style-based youth cultures to which such genres have given rise. Drawing on key research in sociology, media studies and cultural studies, the book considers the cultural significance of respective post-war popular music genres for young audiences, with reference to issues such as space and place, ethnicity, gender, creativity, education and leisure. A key feature of the book is its departure from conventional Anglo-American perspectives. In addition to British and US examples, the book refers to studies conducted in Germany, Holland, Sweden, Israel, Australia, New Zealand, Mexico, Japan, Russia and Hungary, presenting the cultural relationship between youth culture and popular music as a truly global phenomenon.

    Cultures of Popular Music (Issues in Cultural & Media Studies)

    Andy Bennett

    • What is the relationship between youth culture and popular music?
    • How have they evolved since the second world war?
    • What can we learn from a global perspective?

    In this lively and accessible text, Andy Bennett presents a comprehensive cultural, social and historical overview of post-war popular music genres, from rock ‘n’ roll and psychedelic pop, through punk and heavy metal, to rap, rave and techno. Providing a chapter by chapter account, Bennett also examines the style-based youth cultures to which such genres have given rise. Drawing on key research in sociology, media studies and cultural studies, the book considers the cultural significance of respective post-war popular music genres for young audiences, with reference to issues such as space and place, ethnicity, gender, creativity, education and leisure. A key feature of the book is its departure from conventional Anglo-American perspectives. In addition to British and US examples, the book refers to studies conducted in Germany, Holland, Sweden, Israel, Australia, New Zealand, Mexico, Japan, Russia and Hungary, presenting the cultural relationship between youth culture and popular music as a truly global phenomenon.

  6. Textual Poachers: Television Fans and Participatory Culture

Henry Jenkins

The twentieth anniversary edition of Henry Jenkins’s Textual Poachers brings this now-canonical text to a new generation of students interested in the intersections of fandom, participatory culture, popular consumption and media theory.

Supplementing the original, classic text is an interview between Henry Jenkins and Suzanne Scott in which Jenkins reflects upon changes in the field since the original release of Textual Poachers. A study guide by Louisa Stein helps provides instructors with suggestions for the way *Textual Poachers *can be used in the contemporary classroom, and study questions encourage students to consider fan cultures in relation to consumer capitalism, genre, gender, sexuality, and more.

    Textual Poachers: Television Fans and Participatory Culture

    Henry Jenkins

    The twentieth anniversary edition of Henry Jenkins’s Textual Poachers brings this now-canonical text to a new generation of students interested in the intersections of fandom, participatory culture, popular consumption and media theory.

    Supplementing the original, classic text is an interview between Henry Jenkins and Suzanne Scott in which Jenkins reflects upon changes in the field since the original release of Textual Poachers. A study guide by Louisa Stein helps provides instructors with suggestions for the way *Textual Poachers *can be used in the contemporary classroom, and study questions encourage students to consider fan cultures in relation to consumer capitalism, genre, gender, sexuality, and more.

  7. The Korean Wave: As Viewed Through the Pages of The New York Times in 2007

New York Times

    The Korean Wave: As Viewed Through the Pages of The New York Times in 2007

    New York Times

  8. The Korean Wave : As Viewed Through the Pages of the New York Times in 2006

Korean Cultural Service

"This booklet is a collection of 52 articles selected by Korean Cultural Service, New York from articles on Korean culture by The New York Times in 2006"—P.. [1].

    The Korean Wave : As Viewed Through the Pages of the New York Times in 2006

    Korean Cultural Service

    "This booklet is a collection of 52 articles selected by Korean Cultural Service, New York from articles on Korean culture by The New York Times in 2006"—P.. [1].

  9. Debates in the Digital Humanities

Matthew K. Gold


  
    Encompassing new technologies, research methods, and opportunities for collaborative scholarship and open-source peer review, as well as innovative ways of sharing knowledge and teaching, the digital humanities promises to transform the liberal arts—and perhaps the university itself. Indeed, at a time when many academic institutions are facing austerity budgets, digital humanities programs have been able to hire new faculty, establish new centers and initiatives, and attract multimillion-dollar grants.
  


    Clearly the digital humanities has reached a significant moment in its brief history. But what sort of moment is it? Debates in the Digital Humanities brings together leading figures in the field to explore its theories, methods, and practices and to clarify its multiple possibilities and tensions. From defining what a digital humanist is and determining whether the field has (or needs) theoretical grounding, to discussions of coding as scholarship and trends in data-driven research, this cutting-edge volume delineates the current state of the digital humanities and envisions potential futures and challenges. At the same time, several essays aim pointed critiques at the field for its lack of attention to race, gender, class, and sexuality; the inadequate level of diversity among its practitioners; its absence of political commitment; and its preference for research over teaching.
  


    Together, the essays in Debates in the Digital Humanities—which will be published both as a printed book and later as an ongoing, open-access website—suggest that the digital humanities is uniquely positioned to contribute to the revival of the humanities and academic life.
  


    Contributors: Bryan Alexander, National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education; Rafael Alvarado, U of Virginia; Jamie “Skye” Bianco, U of Pittsburgh; Ian Bogost, Georgia Institute of Technology; Stephen Brier, CUNY Graduate Center; Daniel J. Cohen, George Mason U; Cathy N. Davidson, Duke U; Rebecca Frost Davis, National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education; Johanna Drucker, U of California, Los Angeles; Amy E. Earhart, Texas A&M U; Charlie Edwards; Kathleen Fitzpatrick, Pomona College; Julia Flanders, Brown U; Neil Fraistat, U of Maryland; Paul Fyfe, Florida State U; Michael Gavin, Rice U; David Greetham, CUNY Graduate Center; Jim Groom, U of Mary Washington; Gary Hall, Coventry U, UK; Mills Kelly, George Mason U; Matthew Kirschenbaum, U of Maryland; Alan Liu, U of California, Santa Barbara; Elizabeth Losh, U of California, San Diego; Lev Manovich, U of California, San Diego; Willard McCarty, King’s College London; Tara McPherson, U of Southern California; Bethany Nowviskie, U of Virginia; Trevor Owens, Library of Congress; William Pannapacker, Hope College; Dave Parry, U of Texas at Dallas; Stephen Ramsay, U of Nebraska, Lincoln; Alexander Reid, SUNY at Buffalo; Geoffrey Rockwell, Canadian Institute for Research Computing in the Arts; Mark L. Sample, George Mason U; Tom Scheinfeldt, George Mason U; Kathleen Marie Smith; Lisa Spiro, National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education; Patrik Svensson, Umeå U; Luke Waltzer, Baruch College; Matthew Wilkens, U of Notre Dame; George H. Williams, U of South Carolina Upstate; Michael Witmore, Folger Shakespeare Library.

    Debates in the Digital Humanities

    Matthew K. Gold

    Encompassing new technologies, research methods, and opportunities for collaborative scholarship and open-source peer review, as well as innovative ways of sharing knowledge and teaching, the digital humanities promises to transform the liberal arts—and perhaps the university itself. Indeed, at a time when many academic institutions are facing austerity budgets, digital humanities programs have been able to hire new faculty, establish new centers and initiatives, and attract multimillion-dollar grants.

    Clearly the digital humanities has reached a significant moment in its brief history. But what sort of moment is it? Debates in the Digital Humanities brings together leading figures in the field to explore its theories, methods, and practices and to clarify its multiple possibilities and tensions. From defining what a digital humanist is and determining whether the field has (or needs) theoretical grounding, to discussions of coding as scholarship and trends in data-driven research, this cutting-edge volume delineates the current state of the digital humanities and envisions potential futures and challenges. At the same time, several essays aim pointed critiques at the field for its lack of attention to race, gender, class, and sexuality; the inadequate level of diversity among its practitioners; its absence of political commitment; and its preference for research over teaching.

    Together, the essays in Debates in the Digital Humanities—which will be published both as a printed book and later as an ongoing, open-access website—suggest that the digital humanities is uniquely positioned to contribute to the revival of the humanities and academic life.

    Contributors: Bryan Alexander, National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education; Rafael Alvarado, U of Virginia; Jamie “Skye” Bianco, U of Pittsburgh; Ian Bogost, Georgia Institute of Technology; Stephen Brier, CUNY Graduate Center; Daniel J. Cohen, George Mason U; Cathy N. Davidson, Duke U; Rebecca Frost Davis, National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education; Johanna Drucker, U of California, Los Angeles; Amy E. Earhart, Texas A&M U; Charlie Edwards; Kathleen Fitzpatrick, Pomona College; Julia Flanders, Brown U; Neil Fraistat, U of Maryland; Paul Fyfe, Florida State U; Michael Gavin, Rice U; David Greetham, CUNY Graduate Center; Jim Groom, U of Mary Washington; Gary Hall, Coventry U, UK; Mills Kelly, George Mason U; Matthew Kirschenbaum, U of Maryland; Alan Liu, U of California, Santa Barbara; Elizabeth Losh, U of California, San Diego; Lev Manovich, U of California, San Diego; Willard McCarty, King’s College London; Tara McPherson, U of Southern California; Bethany Nowviskie, U of Virginia; Trevor Owens, Library of Congress; William Pannapacker, Hope College; Dave Parry, U of Texas at Dallas; Stephen Ramsay, U of Nebraska, Lincoln; Alexander Reid, SUNY at Buffalo; Geoffrey Rockwell, Canadian Institute for Research Computing in the Arts; Mark L. Sample, George Mason U; Tom Scheinfeldt, George Mason U; Kathleen Marie Smith; Lisa Spiro, National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education; Patrik Svensson, Umeå U; Luke Waltzer, Baruch College; Matthew Wilkens, U of Notre Dame; George H. Williams, U of South Carolina Upstate; Michael Witmore, Folger Shakespeare Library.

  10. Phantasmal Media: An Approach to Imagination, Computation, and Expression

D. Fox Harrell

In Phantasmal Media, D. Fox Harrell considers the expressive power of computational media. He argues, forcefully and persuasively, that the great expressive potential of computational media comes from the ability to construct and reveal phantasms — blends of cultural ideas and sensory imagination. These ubiquitous and often-unseen phantasms — cognitive phenomena that include sense of self, metaphors, social categories, narrative, and poetic thinking — influence almost all our everyday experiences. Harrell offers an approach for understanding and designing computational systems that have the power to evoke these phantasms, paying special attention to the exposure of oppressive phantasms and the creation of empowering ones. He argues for the importance of cultural content, diverse worldviews, and social values in computing. The expressive power of phantasms is not purely aesthetic, he contends; phantasmal media can express and construct the types of meaning central to the human condition.

Harrell discusses, among other topics, the phantasm as an orienting perspective for developers; expressive epistemologies, or data structures based on subjective human worldviews; morphic semiotics (building on the computer scientist Joseph Goguen’s theory of algebraic semiotics); cultural phantasms that influence consensus and reveal other perspectives; computing systems based on cultural models; interaction and expression; and the ways that real-world information is mapped onto, and instantiated by, computational data structures.

The concept of phantasmal media, Harrell argues, offers new possibilities for using the computer to understand and improve the human condition through the human capacity to imagine.

    Phantasmal Media: An Approach to Imagination, Computation, and Expression

    D. Fox Harrell

    In Phantasmal Media, D. Fox Harrell considers the expressive power of computational media. He argues, forcefully and persuasively, that the great expressive potential of computational media comes from the ability to construct and reveal phantasms — blends of cultural ideas and sensory imagination. These ubiquitous and often-unseen phantasms — cognitive phenomena that include sense of self, metaphors, social categories, narrative, and poetic thinking — influence almost all our everyday experiences. Harrell offers an approach for understanding and designing computational systems that have the power to evoke these phantasms, paying special attention to the exposure of oppressive phantasms and the creation of empowering ones. He argues for the importance of cultural content, diverse worldviews, and social values in computing. The expressive power of phantasms is not purely aesthetic, he contends; phantasmal media can express and construct the types of meaning central to the human condition.

    Harrell discusses, among other topics, the phantasm as an orienting perspective for developers; expressive epistemologies, or data structures based on subjective human worldviews; morphic semiotics (building on the computer scientist Joseph Goguen’s theory of algebraic semiotics); cultural phantasms that influence consensus and reveal other perspectives; computing systems based on cultural models; interaction and expression; and the ways that real-world information is mapped onto, and instantiated by, computational data structures.

    The concept of phantasmal media, Harrell argues, offers new possibilities for using the computer to understand and improve the human condition through the human capacity to imagine.

  11. Memes in Digital Culture (MIT Press Essential Knowledge)

Limor Shifman

In December 2012, the exuberant video “Gangnam Style” became the first YouTube clip to be viewed more than one billion times. Thousands of its viewers responded by creating and posting their own variations of the video—“Mitt Romney Style,” “NASA Johnson Style,” “Egyptian Style,” and many others. “Gangnam Style” (and its attendant parodies, imitations, and derivations) is one of the most famous examples of an Internet meme: a piece of digital content that spreads quickly around the web in various iterations and becomes a shared cultural experience. In this book, Limor Shifman investigates Internet memes and what they tell us about digital culture.

Shifman discusses a series of well-known Internet memes — including “Leave Britney Alone,” the pepper-spraying cop, LOLCats, Scumbag Steve, and Occupy Wall Street’s “We Are the 99 Percent.” She offers a novel definition of Internet memes: digital content units with common characteristics, created with awareness of each other, and circulated, imitated, and transformed via the Internet by many users. She differentiates memes from virals; analyzes what makes memes and virals successful; describes popular meme genres; discusses memes as new modes of political participation in democratic and nondemocratic regimes; and examines memes as agents of globalization.

Memes, Shifman argues, encapsulate some of the most fundamental aspects of the Internet in general and of the participatory Web 2.0 culture in particular. Internet memes may be entertaining, but in this book Limor Shifman makes a compelling argument for taking them seriously.

    Memes in Digital Culture (MIT Press Essential Knowledge)

    Limor Shifman

    In December 2012, the exuberant video “Gangnam Style” became the first YouTube clip to be viewed more than one billion times. Thousands of its viewers responded by creating and posting their own variations of the video—“Mitt Romney Style,” “NASA Johnson Style,” “Egyptian Style,” and many others. “Gangnam Style” (and its attendant parodies, imitations, and derivations) is one of the most famous examples of an Internet meme: a piece of digital content that spreads quickly around the web in various iterations and becomes a shared cultural experience. In this book, Limor Shifman investigates Internet memes and what they tell us about digital culture.

    Shifman discusses a series of well-known Internet memes — including “Leave Britney Alone,” the pepper-spraying cop, LOLCats, Scumbag Steve, and Occupy Wall Street’s “We Are the 99 Percent.” She offers a novel definition of Internet memes: digital content units with common characteristics, created with awareness of each other, and circulated, imitated, and transformed via the Internet by many users. She differentiates memes from virals; analyzes what makes memes and virals successful; describes popular meme genres; discusses memes as new modes of political participation in democratic and nondemocratic regimes; and examines memes as agents of globalization.

    Memes, Shifman argues, encapsulate some of the most fundamental aspects of the Internet in general and of the participatory Web 2.0 culture in particular. Internet memes may be entertaining, but in this book Limor Shifman makes a compelling argument for taking them seriously.

  12. The Globalization Reader

Frank J. Lechner and John Boli

Thoroughly revised and updated, *The Globalization Reader, Fourth Edition *offers a provocative assessment of globalization by reviewing the current debates and ongoing research on the topic, providing readers with the most comprehensive introduction to globalization available today.
*   Fully revised and updated with new readings on global governance, world soccer, the recent global financial crisis, global health, American evangelicals, and tropical deforestation
*   Includes coverage on economic globalization, the role of media and religion in cultural globalization, and the link between environmentalism and the globalization of social problems
*   Features coverage that ranges across economic, political, cultural, and experiential dimensions of social change 
*   Offers a wide variety of perspectives on globalization and captures many of the fault lines in current debates
*   Stimulates discussion by including provocative contemporary works and by structuring sections around arguments that serve as connecting themes

    The Globalization Reader

    Frank J. Lechner and John Boli

    Thoroughly revised and updated, *The Globalization Reader, Fourth Edition *offers a provocative assessment of globalization by reviewing the current debates and ongoing research on the topic, providing readers with the most comprehensive introduction to globalization available today. * Fully revised and updated with new readings on global governance, world soccer, the recent global financial crisis, global health, American evangelicals, and tropical deforestation * Includes coverage on economic globalization, the role of media and religion in cultural globalization, and the link between environmentalism and the globalization of social problems * Features coverage that ranges across economic, political, cultural, and experiential dimensions of social change * Offers a wide variety of perspectives on globalization and captures many of the fault lines in current debates * Stimulates discussion by including provocative contemporary works and by structuring sections around arguments that serve as connecting themes

  13. The Global Music Industry: Three Perspectives

Arthur Bernstein

For everyone in the music industry—record labels, managers, music publishers, and the performers themselves—it is important to understand the world music marketplace and how it functions. Yet remarkably little has been written about the music business outside of the U.S.  *The Global Music Industry: Three Perspectives *gives a concise overview of the issues facing everyone in the international music industry. Designed for an introductory course on music business, the book begins with an introduction to the field around the world, then focuses on global issues by region, from bootlegging and copyright to censorship and government support. It will be a standard resource for students, professionals, and musicians. 
 

    The Global Music Industry: Three Perspectives

    Arthur Bernstein

    For everyone in the music industry—record labels, managers, music publishers, and the performers themselves—it is important to understand the world music marketplace and how it functions. Yet remarkably little has been written about the music business outside of the U.S.  *The Global Music Industry: Three Perspectives *gives a concise overview of the issues facing everyone in the international music industry. Designed for an introductory course on music business, the book begins with an introduction to the field around the world, then focuses on global issues by region, from bootlegging and copyright to censorship and government support. It will be a standard resource for students, professionals, and musicians.  

  14. Music Distribution: Selling Music in the New Entertainment Marketplace

C. Michael Brae

This Book is a comprehensive study of the music industry distribution system. The intent is to convey total understanding of the process of music distribution as well as the significance of that process and all it’s variables. Marketing through cutting-edge web-technology and how to incorporate into digital and retail distribution networks supporting soundscan capabilities, is discussed. Distribution is but one aspect of the business end of this industry, arguably the most vital. The importance of distribution is stressed along with the importance of other contiguous aspects such as sales, marketing and promotions including radio-internet radio, retail, trades, music aggregators, street-promotions, and college-networks. This edition includes current industry statistics, trends and new innovative ways in selling your music through both digital and physical CDs.

    Music Distribution: Selling Music in the New Entertainment Marketplace

    C. Michael Brae

    This Book is a comprehensive study of the music industry distribution system. The intent is to convey total understanding of the process of music distribution as well as the significance of that process and all it’s variables. Marketing through cutting-edge web-technology and how to incorporate into digital and retail distribution networks supporting soundscan capabilities, is discussed. Distribution is but one aspect of the business end of this industry, arguably the most vital. The importance of distribution is stressed along with the importance of other contiguous aspects such as sales, marketing and promotions including radio-internet radio, retail, trades, music aggregators, street-promotions, and college-networks. This edition includes current industry statistics, trends and new innovative ways in selling your music through both digital and physical CDs.

  15. Tune In, Log On: Soaps, Fandom, and Online Community (New Media Cultures)

Nancy K. Baym

**
Tune In, Log Out is an ethnographic study of an Internet soap opera fan group. Bridging the fields of computer-mediated communication and audience studies, the book shows how verbal and non verbal communicative practices create collaborative interpretations and criticism, group humor, interpersonal relationships, group norms and individual identity. While much has been written about problems and inequities women have encountered online, Nancy K Baym’s analysis of a female-dominated group in which female communication styles prevail demonstrates that women can build successful online communities while still welcoming male participation. In addition, a longitudinal look at the development of fan group allows an examination of the endurance of the group’s social structure in the face of the Internet’s tremendous growth. Lively and engaging, Tune In, Log Out provides an entertaining introduction to issues of online and audience community.

    Tune In, Log On: Soaps, Fandom, and Online Community (New Media Cultures)

    Nancy K. Baym

    ** Tune In, Log Out is an ethnographic study of an Internet soap opera fan group. Bridging the fields of computer-mediated communication and audience studies, the book shows how verbal and non verbal communicative practices create collaborative interpretations and criticism, group humor, interpersonal relationships, group norms and individual identity. While much has been written about problems and inequities women have encountered online, Nancy K Baym’s analysis of a female-dominated group in which female communication styles prevail demonstrates that women can build successful online communities while still welcoming male participation. In addition, a longitudinal look at the development of fan group allows an examination of the endurance of the group’s social structure in the face of the Internet’s tremendous growth. Lively and engaging, Tune In, Log Out provides an entertaining introduction to issues of online and audience community.

Otlet's Shelf theme by Andrew LeClair & Rob Giampietro.